About Us

 

Mission Statement

The Boerum Hill Association, a volunteer organization of residents of Boerum Hill, seeks to preserve and enhance the unique qualities of our neighborhood through advocacy, education and community building.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

2016 -2017 Board Members

  • President: Howard Kolins
  • Vice Presidents: Dwight Smith
  • Treasurer: Rose Weber (non-board member)
  • Secretary: currently rotates
Directors:

Message from the President

The BHA continues to balance preservation and progress.
We’ve been able to achieve some great things:

  • Down-zoning the neighborhood to protect our Brownstone charm.
  • The renovation of 16 Sycamores Playground (on Schermerhorn Street, just west of Third Avenue).
  • Brooklyn’s First Neighborhood Slow Zone with a 20 mph limit.

Nothing stays the same for very long. We want to preserve our low-rise, leafy streets and continue to be a tight-knit, friendly community. Downtown residential construction will bring thousands of residents over the next decade who will dine and shop on Atlantic Avenue and Smith Street. While we welcome new residents and business it’s important to retain the qualities that first brought us to Boerum Hill.

Modern Boerum Hill began in the 1960’s when a new resident named Helen Buckler saw possibilities in the old brick buildings. She moved in during 1962 and began renovating her brownstone - she had affection for fireplaces so she opened four in her home.

She gathered a few neighbors to create a neighborhood association but initially it didn’t have a name. She wanted a name that could conjure the charm of the well-established neighborhoods like Brooklyn Heights and Park Slope.

Ms. Buckler considered the name Sycamore Hill until a trip to the Brooklyn Historical Society led her to discover a map from 1775 depicting the 80 acre farm of Simon Boerum. Although there was no hill at all, the name Boerum Hill was adopted for the association in 1964.

It took a while for the name Boerum Hill to take hold but in a few years other renovation-minded homeowners purchased and rolled up their sleeves. For the next decade, these families were bound by trading tips on the best ways to renew these old homes.

These early residents built a community that we want to honor and protect. One where neighbors work together. We seek to continue to improve our homes and bonds with our neighbors. Join us in this effort.

In community,
Howard Kolins
President